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Conversations about Optimizing Hospital Operations

Hallway Boarding: An Unnecessary Ethical Dilemma Faced by Hospitals

Hallway BoardingHallway Boarding’ is a quaint euphemism for parking sick people in hallways until their room is ready.

It used to be done in Emergency Departments when no in-patient beds were available. Now some facilities are “admitting” ED patients to the hallways of inpatient units.

In pain, under stress, wearing gowns open at the rear with a port-a-potty for a bathroom, these patients are the victims of turf wars caused by hospital overcrowding.

The hospitals say they want to relieve pressure in the ED so patients needing urgent care can be treated. But they also admit they want to bring the overcrowding problem to inpatient units. They reason that the patient’s presence forces nurses and others to perform more timely discharges, bed turnovers and admissions.

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Categories: Overcrowding, Patient Flow

The Hospital Efficiency Imperative: Free New Orleans Symposium!

NOLA SymposiumFree in NOLA: “The Hospital Efficiency Imperative”

The words “free” and “New Orleans” seldom appear in the same sentence, but here’s one time that they do.

TeleTracking is offering a “free” symposium this month in “NOLA” on managing the hospital enterprise in real-time. It’s billed as “The Hospital Efficiency Imperative,” and rightly so, because we are now previewing in the U.S. Supreme Court what will inevitably happen to hospitals if they don’t decide for themselves how to become more efficient.

Registration is open for the conference being held April 19 & 20 at the Astor Crowne Plaza.  The conference will cover trends and solutions in patient throughput and overcrowding, asset management and inter-hospital patient transfers.

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Categories: Real-Time Capacity Management

Critical Care Nurses: Transfer Center ‘Point Guards’

Hoop DreamsIn honor of March Madness!

NURSES:  Point Guards in the Fight Against Hospital Diversions

There’s no question that automated hospital Transfer Centers are saving lives. What is often overlooked is the amount of revenue they generate, and the important role nurses are playing in evolving the Transfer Center.

Critical care nurses are the “point guards” in the most successful Transfer Centers around the country. In fact, a key “Best Practice” for implementing a successful transfer center operationcalls for critical care nurses to man the Transfer Center on a 24/7 basis because they are so adept at making fast, smart decisions regarding patient care.

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Categories: Author: Dennis Morabito, Bed Management, Patient Flow, Transfer / Referral Center

Clinical vs. Operational Platforms: Taking the Bull By the Horns

Clinical vs. Operational PlatformsSo, we thought we’d jump in with both feet and take on thechallenge of clinical (EMRs) vs. operational (capacity, optimization, throughput) platforms.

While the adoption of electronic health records has been good for healthcare, it has also created many additional stresses on already burdened caregivers.   A chaotic environment remains on the operational side of hospitals because of deep vendor and solution fragmentation with little to no integration.

A lot of bull has been slung around – plus around $20 billion in cold, hard cash – concerning the impact of Electronic Medical Records on healthcare.

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Categories: Operational Efficiency, Real-Time Capacity Management

The Capacity Blues: A Capacity Management Sing Along!

Capacity ManagementThe Capacity Blues – A Sing Along!

This is fun, fun, fun! We’re getting ready for an upcomingTeleTracking Patient Flow Symposium in New Orleans.

In honor of the venue, Sal Sanzo, one of our employees (who happens to be a talented actor, singer, musician in addition to being a Regional Director at TeleTracking RTLS) wrote and performed the attached – entitled The Capacity Blues.

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Categories: Real-Time Capacity Management

Hospital Fiscal Responsibility in Mission Statements: Does It Belong?

HealthLeaders MagazineA Sample of Hospital Mission Statements –Does Fiscal Responsibility Belong?


As a follow up to our No Margin, No Mission post, I thought I’d explore
 hospital mission statements to investigate how they balance margin and mission. I expected (and found) most led with a commitment to providing excellent physical, emotional and spiritual care, but was surprised to identify that many go on to make mention of “responsible use of resources” in some way.  Certainly, mission and margin are top of mind in many hospitals across the country.

Consider these interesting examples:

… mission is to provide quality health services for the community …  consistent with the best service we can give at the highest value for all concerned.

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Categories: Author: Michael Gallup, No Margin, No Mission, Overcrowding, Patient Flow

No Margin, No Mission: Flying Nuns and Sister Irene Kraus

Flying NunFlying Nuns Defined Mission; Sister Irene Defined Margin.

They wore winged habits that were the inspiration for the TV series “The Flying Nun”. They were known as the Daughters of Charity.  Founded in 1633, their mission was to care for the sick, aged, infirm and poor.  For more than four centuries, their mission remained essentially the same.  Then a spirited American girl came along to add something new.

It was called “Margin.”

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Categories: No Margin, No Mission

TeleTracking Blog Rules of Engagement

Rules of EngagementHere are the TeleTracking Blog Rules of Engagement.

We want to be an engaging place to discuss the no margin, no mission philosophy in healthcare, keep you updated on the healthcare industry and how it’s evolving; discuss technology as an enabler and the people and process change that are really required to make an impact.

 

We want to hear from you on other subjects or themes that are relevant. To create the best possible forum for discussion, we have developed the following guidelines for posting comments:

1. We welcome your thoughts, comments, suggestions, and questions. When you leave comments, please make sure they are of general interest to most readers. Of course, profanity, racial and ethnic slurs, and rude behavior won’t be tolerated nor published. We will quickly remove any comments that are offensive, disrespectful or irrelevant.

2. We encourage you to respond to our bloggers and to the comments of other individuals. Even though The TeleTracking Blog is moderated, we promise to present opposing viewpoints and will strive to keep posts interesting, diverse, and multi-sided. We discourage anonymous comments as they don’t facilitate conversation.

3. TeleTracking Team sincerely wants to engage in a conversation with you, but also ask that you be patient with our Team for a response. Our bloggers all have “day jobs”, travel frequently, and may take a few days to respond.

4. Some final “fine print” caveats:

  • Remember this blog is a public forum – don’t post anything confidential or private.
  • Also, these are the personal views of the individuals posting here, and not necessarily those of the Company.
  • And lastly, this is not the place to submit specific customer service questions or technical support inquires. If you do have a specific customer issue or if this is a Technical Support request or other solution specific issue, please call 1-877-570-6903 or use ourtechnical support form to ensure prompt service. Thank you.

Thank you for reading, visiting, commenting and contributing. We’re excited to have you here!

The TeleTracking Blog Team

Categories: About Us

Welcome to the TeleTracking Blog!

TeleTracking BlogWelcome to the TeleTracking Blog!

First, an introduction.

TeleTracking optimizes the physical operations of hospitals through real-time resource management to help them achieve the financial health needed for quality patient care and maximum access.

Although TeleTracking is a little late in coming to the blogosphere, we’re thrilled to introduce this blog as a discussion forum to tackle the operational challenges that confront healthcare, and to identify and share what hospital leaders are doing to solve them.

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Categories: About Us